Seam Rippers Little Ball Secret Exposed!

 

 

Use your presser foot to hold the fabric tight as you rip the seams.

It helps reduce the chance of rippers point from cutting the fabric.

With a good seam ripper, we can trick everyone into believing that we are the perfect quilters.

Most people think the blade of the seam ripper is the most important part, but that’s wrong. After we see how to use the little red ball we realize how incredibly fast it can work.

One way to get started is to cut one stitch at a time. To be more efficient, once you’ve cut a few stitches, turn it around and use the red ball. That’s where the fun begins….

The following tutorial demonstrates just how easy it is to use the red ball and to be a more efficient seam ripper!

 


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74 Responses to “Seam Rippers Little Ball Secret Exposed!”

  1. Heather

    Nov 13. 2015

    amazing , wish I had known that last week. Thank you.

    Reply to this comment
  2. Diana Knox Edwards

    Nov 13. 2015

    Will give it a try

    Reply to this comment
  3. Adele Musgrave

    Nov 13. 2015

    Janie Roddom

    Reply to this comment
  4. Donna Spinney

    Nov 13. 2015

    wow never knew that. will definitely use it this way from now on

    Reply to this comment
  5. Pamela McCalligett

    Nov 13. 2015

    Sandy Campbell

    Reply to this comment
  6. Tess Perry

    Nov 13. 2015

    Nobody showed me, but that’s how I’ve always used it! It just made sense

    Reply to this comment
  7. Elaine Danowski Bruhn

    Nov 13. 2015

    Quilting teacher showed showed me this today, but I’m sure I learned it in 8th grade!

    Reply to this comment
  8. Kris Herfel McIntosh

    Nov 13. 2015

    I’ve used this technique and still ripped/cut the fabric.

    Reply to this comment
  9. Di Thom

    Nov 17. 2015

    Then pick out every little bit of stitch on both sides of your fabric!!!!!

    Reply to this comment
  10. Chris Welsh

    Dec 10. 2015

    Wow, I never knew this!

    Reply to this comment
  11. Joan Fox

    Dec 10. 2015

    Doesn’t always work – most of the time it does work.

    Reply to this comment
  12. Valinda Loy

    Dec 10. 2015

    Jill, have you seen this before?

    Reply to this comment
  13. Tracey Williams

    Dec 10. 2015

    Done this but the other way around so cool will give it a go

    Reply to this comment
  14. Frank N Rose Gombos

    Dec 10. 2015

    great tip I ve used it a couple of times even did the presser foot thing yesterday

    Reply to this comment
  15. Carol Koenig

    Dec 10. 2015

    This is bloody brilliant!!! So many years of sewing and I did not know this!

    Reply to this comment
  16. Judy Juju

    Dec 10. 2015

    Knew that one. 🙂

    Reply to this comment
  17. Jeannie Welsh Kreiser

    Dec 10. 2015

    Last week, I saw this video and have now been using the seam ripper correctly. Faster and easier, but have to make sure you don’t poke a hole with the point.

    Reply to this comment
  18. Tina Cooper-Hawkins

    Dec 10. 2015

    Annette Gidge-Wimbleton

    Reply to this comment
  19. Lol

    Reply to this comment
  20. Victoria Sandritter

    Dec 11. 2015

    Never even thought of that! Great!

    Reply to this comment
  21. Irena Maria Mangone

    Dec 11. 2015

    What is the presser foot thing?

    Reply to this comment
  22. Val Donovan

    Dec 11. 2015

    Who knew?

    Reply to this comment
  23. Linda Havens

    Dec 11. 2015

    i knew this but thanks for the reminder

    Reply to this comment
  24. Tracie Thorne

    Dec 11. 2015

    I knew this but just recently purchased a brass trio of sewing beauty!

    Reply to this comment
  25. Kaye Peters Ammerman

    Dec 11. 2015

    Most often when it hits snags, it is because of a tension issue with the stitching. As long as the stitches are consistent in length and tension, it will blade thru smoothly. Another issue that I’ve encountered when deconstruction of men’s shirts for quilting (ala Bonnie Hunter) is when the fabric surrounding the seam has shrunk or if the segment of seam to be ripped is not all taut. I’ve found that as I do segments that it’s easy to ease up slightly as I’m nearing the time to catch the next few inches and that might cause a different angle of the blade going against the seam, causing it to either “miss”, or even puncture thru the fabric. Whenever possible, I try to lay whatever I’m ripping on table as she has shown in this video. For me that really makes a difference.

    Reply to this comment
  26. Cheryl Todd

    Dec 11. 2015

    I’ve been sewing for 40 years and never knew this till this year, how weird…

    Reply to this comment
  27. Brendon Jenny Dempsey

    Dec 11. 2015

    June Pluthero Wendy Wood

    Reply to this comment
  28. Jerilyn McClimans

    Dec 11. 2015

    I always wondered what it was for.

    Reply to this comment
  29. Sharon Cooper

    Dec 11. 2015

    Derrhh!

    Reply to this comment
  30. Wendy Wood

    Dec 11. 2015

    Tks Brendon!

    Reply to this comment
  31. Janet Grace

    Dec 12. 2015

    TracieThorne where did you find those

    Reply to this comment
  32. Billie

    Dec 12. 2015

    Please……………Proofread your article before posting. There are so many errors.

    Reply to this comment
    • Phyllis Steele

      Dec 20. 2015

      Oh Please. Did you not understand the audio? Is being the grammar police your job??? GET A LIFE!!! Some people just live to.criticize and then criticize some more. Please go through my message and find my errors since you obviously love to do that. That way you’ll be leaving some other poor soul alone.

      Reply to this comment
  33. Carol Ann Johnson

    Dec 13. 2015

    Cool

    Reply to this comment
  34. Betty Mackey

    Dec 13. 2015

    Thank you!

    Reply to this comment
  35. Jo Schwarz

    Dec 13. 2015

    Most of us that took Home Economics in school, learned this in sewing classes. At least in the 60’s we did. I was surprised to see that some didn’t know this. Or maybe I was lucky enough to have such a good teacher.

    Reply to this comment
  36. Gloria Powell-Babstock

    Dec 13. 2015

    Learn something new everyday :))

    Reply to this comment
  37. Barbara Maddox Snyder

    Dec 13. 2015

    Sharon Yentes

    Reply to this comment
  38. Janice K Berry Pease

    Dec 13. 2015

    Me too…

    Reply to this comment
  39. Denise Wilson

    Dec 14. 2015

    This is brilliant. ….probably was taught this in home-ec in the 60’s but forgot it somewhere along the way. Good reminder!

    Reply to this comment
  40. Becky Corthorn Weimer

    Dec 15. 2015

    Thank you for that reminder. I had seen a different video but teaching the same technique. And that is why it is called a ripper, not a picker.

    Reply to this comment
  41. Deborah Aldridge

    Dec 16. 2015

    I have been sewing about 40 years and didn’t know this!!!!! I will definitely use this tip!

    Reply to this comment
  42. Mammaw Mary

    Dec 16. 2015

    lear something new i didn’t no it could be so fast

    Reply to this comment
  43. I never knew this and I am 78 years old and an older sewer

    Reply to this comment
  44. Patti Cobbin

    Dec 17. 2015

    wish I had seen this tutorial an hour ago. :/

    Reply to this comment
  45. Angela Lee-Brandt

    Dec 18. 2015

    i did it backwards

    Reply to this comment
  46. Carol Berg

    Dec 18. 2015

    mmm, didn’t know that!

    Reply to this comment
  47. Cherryl Reiterman

    Dec 18. 2015

    Have known this all along!

    Reply to this comment
  48. I have always used the ball this way and just assumed everyone did, but still a great video..lol. I expected to see something new and different.

    Reply to this comment
  49. Cindy Williams

    Dec 19. 2015

    WOW Who knew?!? Thank you!!

    Reply to this comment
  50. Kris Webb

    Dec 20. 2015

    Garment makers are more likely to know this since they deal with longer seams. Many quilters never made clothing so may not know this. What seems to be obvious to others is really just something they learned a long time ago and has become 2nd nature.

    Reply to this comment
  51. Cherri Hankins

    Dec 20. 2015

    It can still cut the fabric and I’d like to see the documentation that shows this is how it was intended!

    Reply to this comment
  52. Rhonda Jennings

    Dec 22. 2015

    Wow! Great tip! I never knew this.

    Reply to this comment
  53. Susan Brewer

    Dec 22. 2015

    Fantastic!

    Reply to this comment
  54. Jill

    Dec 23. 2015

    Wow, never learned this in Home Econ class in the 1970’s. Never learned until today!!! Great!!! Have two quilt blocks put together backwards – will try this method on them!

    Reply to this comment
  55. Letitia Beckley

    Dec 23. 2015

    I have sewn for about 60 years and just learned this last week. Wished I’d known this years ago. It really works. I had to rip out a seam yesterday and used this idea. So quick and easy. Something I want to remember.

    Reply to this comment
  56. Linda Shumway

    Dec 24. 2015

    I used this for years until my ball fell off!

    Reply to this comment
  57. Karin Kilmer MacDonell

    Dec 24. 2015

    I can’t believe people did not know the proper use of this tool !!

    Reply to this comment
  58. Nancy Richter

    Dec 25. 2015

    You can’t use this method on all fabrics. You can get away with it on medium and heavier weight cottons. The other fabrics you won’t and can’t. because of the nature and weave of the fiber and fabric.
    That’s why I stopped using that methd…sliced a seam opening a zipper on a cotton dress..

    Reply to this comment
  59. Cindy Weaver

    Dec 27. 2015

    Wish I knew about this also.

    Reply to this comment
  60. Marilyn Gore

    Dec 27. 2015

    I learned this years ago and the first time I ripped through the fabric, I stopped using it this way. Much safer to just pluck out every third stitch and pull the bottom thread.

    Reply to this comment
  61. Sofia Lechner

    Dec 28. 2015

    I have been using the seam ripper for most of my life, you are supposed to have the ball under so it does not catch the fabric, never had a problem with it!

    Reply to this comment
  62. Debbie Petzold

    Dec 28. 2015

    learned as a kid how to sew and use a seam ripper. This must be a reminder for the younger set!

    Reply to this comment
  63. Her hand was in the way for most of it,so I didn’t really get what she was trying to show.

    Reply to this comment
  64. Michele White

    Dec 30. 2015

    I may try that again.. I sliced several seams that I couldn’t fix when I realized that I was not quite bright enough to use that method!!

    Reply to this comment
  65. Suzanne Cosmo

    Dec 31. 2015

    That is true Nancy, but really I thought everyone knew that ball thing anyway.

    Reply to this comment
  66. Louise Weaver

    Dec 31. 2015

    I’ve been through the same thing. I also quit doing it with the ball, fabric is too pricy to ruin!

    Reply to this comment
  67. Danni Hart

    Jan 01. 2016

    Oh good, I’ve been doing it right all these years but it doesn’t work on all fabrics unless you hold it and go slow….even then, you don’t want to use it on fluid fabrics.

    Reply to this comment
  68. Debi Mitchell

    Jan 04. 2016

    That’s how I always use mine.

    Reply to this comment
  69. Diane Cockcroft Morris

    Jan 07. 2016

    This is amazing!

    Reply to this comment
  70. Tina Wold Bowen

    Jan 10. 2016

    verycool

    Reply to this comment
  71. Roberta Wallace

    Jan 10. 2016

    Seriously?? If you need that explained to you you probably should not be near a fast moving needle… lol

    Reply to this comment
  72. Kathy Westberg

    Jan 11. 2016

    This really works better!!!

    Reply to this comment
  73. Rita Lee Burns

    Jan 11. 2016

    I too am 66 yrs old and have been sewing since I was in grade school and this is the first I even question what it was for – mujch less use it for that reason! never too old to learn new stuff!

    Reply to this comment

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